Grandview Avenue Traffic Calming Project

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April 13th Update

Presentation slide deck is available under documents.

Background

The City of Arvada Public Works department is working on a new project to help reduce speeding along Grandview Avenue between Independence Street and Olde Wadsworth Blvd. This page will help the City interact with residents to develop a community supported plan.

In 2020, the City completed the W. 57th Avenue Multimodal Study, which included recommendations to improve bicycling and walking along the corridor, as well as ways to reduce speeding. City staff presented the results of the study to City Council, and Council members directed staff to evaluate and develop a similar traffic calming plan for Grandview Avenue before implementing any changes to W. 57th Avenue. City Council also directed staff for implementation along both corridors to happen at the same time, so as not to negatively impact residents along either street.

City staff collected speed and volume data at six different locations along the corridor and developed a plan to reduce speeding based on this information. The proposed plan will be implemented over time, with a six-month pilot project timeframe for two traffic calming devices along the corridor. The results of that pilot project will help determine the next steps for the traffic calming plan. The current pilot project proposal includes one speed cushion and the option to test one speed hump as well.

What is traffic calming?

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) defines traffic calming as follows:

"The primary purpose of traffic calming is to support the livability and vitality of residential and commercial areas through improvements in non-motorist safety, mobility, and comfort. These objectives are typically achieved by reducing vehicle speeds or volumes on a single street or a street network. Traffic calming measures consist of horizontal, vertical, lane narrowing, roadside, and other features that use self-enforcing physical or psycho-perception means to produce desired effects."

For more detailed information, you can review the FHWA Traffic Calming ePrimer.

What is the difference between a speed hump and a speed cushion?

The Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) defines a speed hump as a "Rounded (vertically along travel path) raised areas of pavement typically 12 to 14 feet in length" and is the width of the roadway. A picture of a speed hump is below.

(Source: ITE Traffic Calming ePrimer)

According to the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE), speed cushions consist of "Two or more raised areas placed laterally across a roadway with gaps between raised areas," with a "height and length similar to a speed hump; spacing of gaps allow emergency vehicles to pass through at higher speeds." A picture of speed cushions is below.

(Source: NACTO)

Speed Studies and Proposed Traffic Calming Plan

You can click the link below to see a summary of the results of the speed studies, the two proposed locations for traffic calming devices during the six-month pilot project, and the proposed long term plan for six speed humps or speed cushions along the corridor.

Click the following link to view an interactive map: Traffic Calming Plan Map

In addition to traffic calming, the City is proposing to reduce the speed limit to 25 mph where it is currently posted at 30 mph. The section of Grandview that is currently 20 mph will remain the same.

Pilot Project Process

The City is proposing to initially start with two traffic calming devices: one near Garrison St and one near Balsam St. These devices will be made of a rubber material and can be installed quickly and inexpensively through a modular system.

The City will collect before and after speed data as well as gather feedback from the public over a six month period. Based on the results of the pilot project, a decision will be made whether or not to make the devices permanent or to remove them. If successful, all six traffic calming devices may be installed in the upcoming years.

Below is a sample image of what the temporary speed cushions would look like.

Public Meeting Information

A public meeting to discuss the speed study results, long term plan, and implementation strategy will be held via Zoom on Tuesday, April 13, at 6:30 p.m. Please register for the meeting.

Below you will be able to access a survey and discussion forum to provide feedback on the proposal to the City. City staff will be monitoring the discussion forum, but will not be providing direct feedback to comments on the forum.

April 13th Update

Presentation slide deck is available under documents.

Background

The City of Arvada Public Works department is working on a new project to help reduce speeding along Grandview Avenue between Independence Street and Olde Wadsworth Blvd. This page will help the City interact with residents to develop a community supported plan.

In 2020, the City completed the W. 57th Avenue Multimodal Study, which included recommendations to improve bicycling and walking along the corridor, as well as ways to reduce speeding. City staff presented the results of the study to City Council, and Council members directed staff to evaluate and develop a similar traffic calming plan for Grandview Avenue before implementing any changes to W. 57th Avenue. City Council also directed staff for implementation along both corridors to happen at the same time, so as not to negatively impact residents along either street.

City staff collected speed and volume data at six different locations along the corridor and developed a plan to reduce speeding based on this information. The proposed plan will be implemented over time, with a six-month pilot project timeframe for two traffic calming devices along the corridor. The results of that pilot project will help determine the next steps for the traffic calming plan. The current pilot project proposal includes one speed cushion and the option to test one speed hump as well.

What is traffic calming?

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) defines traffic calming as follows:

"The primary purpose of traffic calming is to support the livability and vitality of residential and commercial areas through improvements in non-motorist safety, mobility, and comfort. These objectives are typically achieved by reducing vehicle speeds or volumes on a single street or a street network. Traffic calming measures consist of horizontal, vertical, lane narrowing, roadside, and other features that use self-enforcing physical or psycho-perception means to produce desired effects."

For more detailed information, you can review the FHWA Traffic Calming ePrimer.

What is the difference between a speed hump and a speed cushion?

The Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) defines a speed hump as a "Rounded (vertically along travel path) raised areas of pavement typically 12 to 14 feet in length" and is the width of the roadway. A picture of a speed hump is below.

(Source: ITE Traffic Calming ePrimer)

According to the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE), speed cushions consist of "Two or more raised areas placed laterally across a roadway with gaps between raised areas," with a "height and length similar to a speed hump; spacing of gaps allow emergency vehicles to pass through at higher speeds." A picture of speed cushions is below.

(Source: NACTO)

Speed Studies and Proposed Traffic Calming Plan

You can click the link below to see a summary of the results of the speed studies, the two proposed locations for traffic calming devices during the six-month pilot project, and the proposed long term plan for six speed humps or speed cushions along the corridor.

Click the following link to view an interactive map: Traffic Calming Plan Map

In addition to traffic calming, the City is proposing to reduce the speed limit to 25 mph where it is currently posted at 30 mph. The section of Grandview that is currently 20 mph will remain the same.

Pilot Project Process

The City is proposing to initially start with two traffic calming devices: one near Garrison St and one near Balsam St. These devices will be made of a rubber material and can be installed quickly and inexpensively through a modular system.

The City will collect before and after speed data as well as gather feedback from the public over a six month period. Based on the results of the pilot project, a decision will be made whether or not to make the devices permanent or to remove them. If successful, all six traffic calming devices may be installed in the upcoming years.

Below is a sample image of what the temporary speed cushions would look like.

Public Meeting Information

A public meeting to discuss the speed study results, long term plan, and implementation strategy will be held via Zoom on Tuesday, April 13, at 6:30 p.m. Please register for the meeting.

Below you will be able to access a survey and discussion forum to provide feedback on the proposal to the City. City staff will be monitoring the discussion forum, but will not be providing direct feedback to comments on the forum.